Editor Op/Ed - The Mythology Of Vietnam

Boomers International Board: Vietnam Vets's Place: Editor Op/Ed - The Mythology Of Vietnam
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Anonymous on Sunday, May 6, 2001 - 12:14 am:

Op/Ed - Ted Rall - updated 8:11 PM ET May 4
Friday May 04 08:11 PM EDT
The Mythology Of Vietnam
By Ted Rall
A Reality Check for a Clueless Nation

NEW YORK -- Historical memory has never done terribly well in this country, but our national case of collective amnesia over the Vietnam War surely sets a record for mass delusion.

Former Sen. Bob Kerrey (finally) admits that he led a commando raid on the village of Thanh Phong on the night of Feb. 25, 1969, that ended up with the accidental killings of between 12 and 14 unarmed civilians. One of the six men under Kerrey's command alleges that Kerrey ordered the Vietnamese lined up and shot. For all we know, both men may be telling the truth as they remember it. According to Dr. Frank Ochberg, a former associate director of the National Institute of Mental Health, the stress of combat "makes it possible to remember things in a part of the brain that causes you to focus on certain events and completely ignore others."

In an April 29 op-ed piece that appeared in the Washington Post, Sens. John Kerry, D-Mass., Max Cleland, D-Ga., and Chuck Hagel, R-Neb., wrote: "Many people have been forced to do things in war that they are deeply ashamed of later. Yet for our country to blame the warrior instead of the war is among the worst, and, regrettably, most frequent mistakes we as a country can make."

And so the lies live on.

Theoretically, soldiers were drafted for the Vietnam War, and soldiers suffer grievous penalties for disobeying orders. Reality was much different. If you were white and fairly well-off -- as was the 25-year-old Bob Kerrey -- there were countless alternatives to slogging around rice paddies carrying an 80-pound pack. You could get a college deferment, as did Bill Clinton. You could become a weekend warrior in the National Guard, keeping the cornfields safe for democracy, like George W. Bush and Dan Quayle (news - web sites). You could ask a liberal doctor to write your draft board a note saying that your asthma, hammertoes or whatever made you unfit for duty. If your dad golfed with a guy who belonged to the same Elks lodge as a member of the draft board, you were off the hook. And if all else failed, you could do what all the draft-eligible 18- and 19-year-olds from my rock-hard Republican suburban Ohio town did -- head to Canada.

No wonder that wall in Washington is black: African-Americans, along with some poor white folks with no cash and fewer connections, were the only ones who went kicking and screaming to Vietnam.

Films like "Rambo," "Missing in Action" and "Born on the Fourth of July" reinforce powerful and utterly fraudulent myths about the war: Naive, inexperienced idealist finds himself in hot, stinky jungle surrounded by hostile locals he's trying to help and hobbled by wimpy generals unwilling to let him win. The next thing he knows, he's being called "baby killer" by dishy hippie chicks as he retrieves his limbs from the baggage carousel.

First and foremost, the vast majority of reasonably well-off white guys like Bob Kerrey who went to Vietnam decided to go because they were right-wing wack jobs. They believed in the domino theory. They believed in Nixon's silent majority. They thought the tens of thousands of student protesters raising hell on college campuses were commies, wusses and commie wusses. Of course, no one sane believed that America would be saved from godless communism by propping up a corrupt dictatorship on the opposite side of the planet. But these were guys who enjoyed the prospect of blowing holes into slant-eyed gooks.

What happened next is well-documented. Even the most ardent backwater moron discovered upon arrival that the Vietnamese didn't want us there, that the South Vietnamese government was about as democratic as Stalin's USSR, and that we were getting our asses kicked fair and square by a bunch of short tunnel-dwellers in black PJs. A classic war documentary from the era depicts a lieutenant being advised over his radio that the V.C. are to his right. He orders his platoon to the left. They're on the move all day and all night, deliberately avoiding combat. When the sun comes up they've ended up where they began. According to many veterans, this experience wasn't uncommon -- service in the Vietnam War involved staying alive until the end of your tour of duty.

Guys like Bob Kerrey, on the other hand, were gung-ho. He was the commander of a unit in the elite Navy SEALs. Kerrey, and those like him, knew -- or should have known -- that they were fighting a dishonorable war for a dishonorable cause. They didn't have to be there, and once they were there they didn't have to do what they did.

Kerrey lost a leg fighting that war. According to his comrades in the war and in the Senate, he has demonstrated personal courage. Despite the fact that he may have done so for less than pure motives, his willingness to discuss what happened 32 years ago is admirable.

But none of that changes the truth: Everybody knew that Vietnam was stupid and wrong. At the time. That incredibly stupid, brutally wrong war could never have transpired without the enthusiastic participation of people like Bob Kerrey, who knew better and went anyway.

(Ted Rall, 37, is author of two forthcoming books: a graphic novel, "2024," and a collection of cartoons, "Search and Destroy: Cartoons by Ted Rall." Both books will be published this month.

THE CHASM continues .....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Nils on Sunday, June 2, 2002 - 01:26 am:

What a "Crock" on so many levels.

I enlisted wasn't drafted. Many of my friends enlisted. I knew few in my comunity who were drafted. Those of us who did were mostly from blue collar families as the author suggests.
Many in my generation may have thought it was the "right thing to do" as our fathers and uncles did before us in WW2 and Korea.
I also new when I was around twelve in the mid sixties when it was just advisors that it would get alot worse and it would be something that we could not win.

Many years later when I was an Army reservist,most of the senior enlisted NCOs that I knew, (many were now intructors in NCO academies) had been in Vietnam in their youth. Many had enlisted.
I enlisted in the service as a way out of my parents house, a way to learn something I could use for a job and to serve my country like my father and uncles before me. I was idealistic about what I was doing and I did get disillusioned by the leadership around me.
Those few in elite or special programs were a cut above the average and many would follow such leadership, if given the choice of that or staying with the mediocre or incompetant, even if it meant doing something un conventional. Most would not condone outright murder, however.
As for those politicians with selective memory loss, I say BS. When you hold someone down and slice his throat you either did it or you didn't, not "I can't recall". When as a lt. in charge of seals going in to take out political leaders, and VC sympathizers you know ahead of time that you have "carte blanche" to do what you have to do. Revising the history of the situation for present day sensibilities is just BS.

In our present day where the world is smaller through communications and little remains secretly burried in the past, a guy in the public eye has to realize that his past can come up behind him and stop him in his tracks. It is not a far stretch that that person can be brought to justice decades later, if there is evidence for a conviction.
Contrary to the myth not all those in combat were involved in "war crimes", like anything else a few incidents occur and the rest are painted with the same brush in public opinion


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By Nils on Sunday, June 2, 2002 - 01:40 am:

by the way remember the "Tet" offensive in 1968? It was a battle that we did win it was effectivley the last gasp of the VC.
WE could have actually won the war irregardles of whether it was right or wrong to do so, but were only allowed to do things in measured increments.
The author of the first article has the 20/20 hindsight of history and documents with wich to put forth his thoughts, at 37 years old he was born in nineteen sixty four ?, around when the first advisors arrived in the country, and was ten years old in seventy four when the war ended. Many of us regular blue collar folks had no clue as to the internal aspects of the Republic of Vietnam. We only knew what we heard from Walter Cronkite or read in the papers.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of pageLink to this message  By kosmosisus on Tuesday, June 4, 2002 - 03:55 am:

Yep, Ted Rall just got out of his diaper wearing habit in 1968.
LOL


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